Trumpism

Homepage Forums Current Events Board Trumpism

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #4970
      LegendLegend
      Keymaster

      Hey gang.  Is there a coherent definition of what the Democrats consider “Trumpism?”

      I mean, is it a policy position, or just a state of mind?

      ____________________________________________________________
      Sic transit gloria mundi (so shut up and get back to work)

    • #4971
      johnnyo53johnnyo53
      Participant

      Anything that promotes personal responsiblity and smaller government is Trumpism 

      “I remember that one fateful day when Coach took me aside. I knew what was coming. "You don't have to tell me," I said. "I'm off the team, aren't I?" "Well," said Coach, "you never were really ON the team. You made that uniform you're wearing out of rags and towels, and your helmet is a toy space helmet. You show up at practice and then either steal the ball and make us chase you to get it back, or you try to tackle people at inappropriate times." It was all true what he was saying. And yet, I

    • #4972
      AvatarMick
      Participant

      My own take is that committed members of one specific area of the political spectrum come unglued the most — near totally — when the President of the other party is successful.  That was true with the Democrats when Reagan was elected, it was true with Republicans when Clinton was elected, it was true with the Democrats (and many Republicans) when Trump was elected.

      Trump had the additional burden of being a stone A**hole.  He was committed to not making any friends.  In other words, he used methods absolutely guaranteed to reduce his popularity in the middle of a popularity contest.

      For the absolute reverse of that mentality, see Biden, Joe and his comments that he sought unity, that he wanted to unify the country — and then supported policies that had Progressives gasping in disbelief that he gave them what they wanted — and left people on the right in the cold, of course.

    • #4973
      AvatarMick
      Participant

      My own take is that committed members of one specific area of the political spectrum come unglued the most — near totally — when the President of the other party is successful.  That was true with the Democrats when Reagan was elected, it was true with Republicans when Clinton was elected, it was true with the Democrats (and many Republicans) when Trump was elected.

      Trump had the additional burden of being a stone A**hole.  He was committed to not making any friends.  In other words, he used methods absolutely guaranteed to reduce his popularity in the middle of a popularity contest.

      For the absolute reverse of that mentality, see Biden, Joe and his comments that he sought unity, that he wanted to unify the country — and then supported policies that had Progressives gasping in disbelief that he gave them what they wanted — and left people on the right in the cold, of course.

      And by the way…Biden is remaking the Federal judiciary.  He is appointing judges at a rate twice as fast as Trump did.

      https://www.axios.com/biden-judicial-federal-court-ffac832c-131d-4285-bc1a-3c1de9709463.html

    • #4974
      Avatarrogpodge
      Participant

      I was told this was court-packing.

    • #4975
      AvatarCornfed
      Participant

      Well, the Democrats probably think it is about authoritarianism, which is ironic given Nancy Pelosi.  What I think it is in its most abbreviated expression is “America First”.

      • #4978
        LegendLegend
        Keymaster

        I think “America First” is a fair and sympathetic summary, though I do think it’s fair that Trump never did enough on infrastructure or legal immigration to truly invest in America.

        What I was commenting from was an article that had a pundit saying “Trump may be gone, but Trumpism is here to stay.”  I found that to be pretty silly, in that a summary of Trump from a policy perspective is remarkably benign.  Trump the man was the problem, not Trump the policymaker.  If he was a problem, then what policies has Biden done away with immediately that have improved the country?

        Not immigration, that’s a bigger mess now than in 2019.

        Not trade, we still have tariffs on China.

        Not Covid, nothing has changed on COVID policy:  Get immunized, leave the hard decisions to state and local government (oh, by the way, that’s because the President CAN’T do those things).

        Not on foreign policy, we are still withdrawing from Afghanistan, and if anything have taken a more dangerous approach to the middle east under Biden.

        Not on fiscal policy, Biden wants to spend more money than Trump ever recommended.

        Not on energy.  Energy markets may love Biden, but consumers are going to hate him.

        The only difference is Biden is making more concessions internationally than Trump ever would have.  Nord Stream 2 is a good example:  Trump, who was in Russia’s pocket, supposedly, never moved to allow it.  Biden drops U.S. opposition within 6 months of taking office.

        The country really struggles with its definition of “leader.”  I see this all the time in business:  A guy who looks good and talks nicely but who never delivers is considered a leader, while the guy who makes people feel challenged and perhaps just short of adequate but who delivers the goods is considered un-promotable.

        A bias for nice people is a good thing, right up until it leads you down the road to ruin.

        • This reply was modified 2 months ago by LegendLegend.

        ____________________________________________________________
        Sic transit gloria mundi (so shut up and get back to work)

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.