Visualizing all electric cars in America

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    • #6032
      AvatarNeodymium60
      Participant

      I’m open to any information.  I see some advantages but so far I wouldn’t want one.  Seems like more trouble than they are worth. The ride is not that great.

      1. Do they work well in cold weather and snowy icy conditions?
      2. Are they all incented by the government?
      3. The max range is unimpressive.
      4. A lot of people buy $3000 used cars and fix them.  Any $3000 used EV’s?
      5. I have plenty of room for a charger.  What if I decide to live in a condo with no garage?

      Link to all electric cars..

       

    • #6033
      johnnyo53johnnyo53
      Participant

      Towing capability nil, cold weather operation degradation- charging times- front end prices- environmental costs of battery production and battery disposal-  F-ing fantasy for libtards and a big nyet for me…. AND NOBODY TALKS ABOUT MILLIONS OF POWER BOATS…

      “I remember that one fateful day when Coach took me aside. I knew what was coming. "You don't have to tell me," I said. "I'm off the team, aren't I?" "Well," said Coach, "you never were really ON the team. You made that uniform you're wearing out of rags and towels, and your helmet is a toy space helmet. You show up at practice and then either steal the ball and make us chase you to get it back, or you try to tackle people at inappropriate times." It was all true what he was saying. And yet, I

    • #6035
      AvatarMick
      Participant

      Two items: first, average number of lithium ion battery charges are 300 to 500 cycles, which is 2-3 years’ worth of use.  Recently, an announcement was made that says a breakthrough was achieved to extend lithium ion battery life to 1,000 cycles.

      Secondly, there are other promising battery materials, including sulphur, the fifth most common element and can be easily produced in the USA.  Few startups working on that one.

    • #6040
      cardcrimsoncardcrimson
      Participant

      A big issue with electrification is storage, especially with because batteries self discharge. Good lithium ion batteries have a self discharge rate of 5% per month and that rate is continuous. As a comparison, if my gas tank holds 20 gallons, it’s like I’ve a leak in the tank that loses a gallon of gas a month. Not good.

    • #6043
      LegendLegend
      Keymaster

      [quote quote=6040]A big issue with electrification is storage, especially with because batteries self discharge. Good lithium ion batteries have a self discharge rate of 5% per month and that rate is continuous. As a comparison, if my gas tank holds 20 gallons, it’s like I’ve a leak in the tank that loses a gallon of gas a month. Not good.[/quote]

      I didn’t know this.

      Went on a hunt earlier this year where one hunter brought a brand new electric UTV.  It would hardly make it through a few miles of riding when going up hills.  It was really poor. Combine that with how remote our location was and that thing was basically useless.

      Electric has its use case and will get better. I do not see it as a viable option for many of the use cases noted (towing being a really good example), but can see it being viable for 90 percent of drivers.

      The infrastructure will be the limitation.

      ____________________________________________________________
      Sic transit gloria mundi (so shut up and get back to work)

    • #6047
      cardcrimsoncardcrimson
      Participant

      Don’t agree that towing is an issue at all. That’s a motor issue. A friend drove a Tesla semi a few years back (he’s president of a logistics company), said it was amazing. Motor’s can be designed appropriately.

      Storage is an issue, as will be flammability of some battery tech. Infrastructure is indeed a huge issue. To utilize the existing infrastructure, I heard a panel of experts tout hydrogen. Can flow through the natural gas lines just fine and can be stored. Makes a ton of sense.

      Also working with a company that has a graphene based, aluminum ion battery they are developing. Not flammable, can be charged extremely quickly, too (cell phone in 5 minutes). . ..

    • #6049
      rjnwmillrjnwmill
      Participant

      I haven’t looked to carefully at the technology, but useful for 90% of drivers…you sure?

      -Capital costs

      -Political bs.  See negative Tesla narratives arising from Musk’s Twitter tender.  The dopes see the green new deal and speech abridgment as contrary interests?  The left is making their policy objectives mutually exclusive.

      -The recharge cycle time makes the vehicles unsuitable for almost all commercial applications.

      -unpredictable usage applications are fraught with risk with an electrified vehicle.

      -range cut in half, coming and going for typical business day.

      And if they are broadly acceptable, one might ask why penetration in rental fleets is only 5%?

      https://www.ft.com/content/c20e4f4b-1a6e-4b51-a38c-97783e75a847

      Here's a toast with one last pour, may it last forever and a minute more;
      Good fortune seems to you have sung, to live and love way past long

    • #6051
      LegendLegend
      Keymaster

      No I’m not sure on the 90 percent number. It’s a swag. I do think a lot of the kinks (including the towing, though there is a huge difference between an electrified semi and a consumer light truck) will be worked out over time.

      The infrastructure issue is a real question.  Then again just over a hundred years ago oil and gasoline were still delivered in cans and service stations were a glimmer in somebody’s eye. Stuff gets built.

      ____________________________________________________________
      Sic transit gloria mundi (so shut up and get back to work)

    • #6053
      cardcrimsoncardcrimson
      Participant

      Saw on the news this morning that Ford is rolling out an all electric F-150 today, coming out of the same historic plant that built the Model T. I’d imagine the thing can tow.

      Had a chat with the CEO of a graphene based battery company. Their car battery charges extremely fast, so fast, that the existing service lines will have difficulty providing enough electricity quick enough.

    • #6055
      LegendLegend
      Keymaster

      [quote quote=6053]Saw on the news this morning that Ford is rolling out an all electric F-150 today, coming out of the same historic plant that built the Model T. I’d imagine the thing can tow. .[/quote]

      Electric vehicles can tow capably given their motors can make a ton of torque. The issue isn’t capability it’s range/capacity. I think the F150 you mention has a range of about 100 miles when towing a mid size travel trailer (on flat land). That isn’t going to make your camping trip very fun.

      Electric vehicles are runabouts at the moment. They are also really fast and different from internal combustion cars. I couldn’t have one at the moment because of all the limitations. But they are evolving really fast.

      ____________________________________________________________
      Sic transit gloria mundi (so shut up and get back to work)

    • #6056
      LegendLegend
      Keymaster

      Here’s car and driver on the f150:

      https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a36481590/ford-f150-lightning-range-towing/

      ____________________________________________________________
      Sic transit gloria mundi (so shut up and get back to work)

    • #6066
      BeyondThunderdomeBeyondThunderdome
      Participant

      This thread reminds me of the comments about electric vehicles I was seeing in 2017.

      Regarding the 5% energy loss per month mentioned above, yes some batteries and cars lose energy over time, but it’s de minimis. The only time it would ever possibly be an issue is if you parked your car at an airport for a month not plugged in. But most people don’t do that even with internal combustion cars. I own an electric car and have been following electric car forums for many years. There are occasional questions about “phantom” energy loss, but practically speaking it’s not a problem EV owners are complaining about. And most of the energy loss is due to “always on” electrical systems not unique to EVs. Usually the biggest problems end up being due to someone forgetting to turn off Sentry mode (anti theft) on their Tesla or something similar.

      cardcrimson compared it to having a leak in your 20 gallon tank. That sounds ominous, but in reality you’ll save on average about $1000 per year in fuel costs if you drive electric. You’ll also save on oil changes and other maintenance (far few parts to break). Of course, electric cars do cost more up front still. But the total cost of ownership is becoming competitive.

      Range is less than an internal combustion vehicle and it does take longer to charge than to fill a tank, but unless you’re a person going on frequent, very long road trips, it’s really not going to add much time to your travels. Something like 98 or 99% of all miles are driven within a short distance from someone’s home. And those who do go on road trips invariably report that the whole “range anxiety” thing is way overblown. A trip between SF and LA would not take that much longer, for example. If you’re doing that every weekend, then sure maybe it’s going to add up and you might not want an EV. But the vast majority of people aren’t going to have issues.

      Electric cars aren’t for everyone (e.g., towing or if you live in an apartment without chargers). But things are changing rapidly. Technology is improving and costs are coming down. Infrastructure is growing rapidly too. In ten years (and probably sooner) only a small minority of people will be buying internal combustion cars, except used ones.

      NO MALARKEY

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